Squalane Oil Benefits for Skin & Hair

Squalane Oil Benefits for Skin & Hair

Squalane Oil 

What is squalane oil, and what does it do? 

What is the origin of squalane? 

What are some of the advantages of squalane oil? 

What skin types are the greatest candidates for squalane oil?

What is the most effective technique to apply squalane oil? 

Take Away 

Squalane oil is growing more popular as a skincare ingredient, and it's likely that it's already in one of the products you're using right now. The trendy ingredient claims to have ultra-moisturizing and anti-aging properties, but is it necessary to include in your skincare routine? We spoke with dermatologists to learn everything there is to know about squalane oil, including where it originates from, what it can do for your skin, and how to use it. 

The emergence of squalane oil in many skin and hair formulas is likely to have peaked attention for those of us who prefer to keep up with all of the newest skincare discoveries and trends. With a unique name that conjures up images of a violent storm at sea while also resembling a portion of the scientific term for sharks. And, as strange as its name may appear, it appears to be in practically everything these days. 

What is squalane oil, and what does it do? 

The first thing to know about squalane is that it's a shelf-stable type of squalene that's been hydrogenated. Squalene is a lipid, or fat, created naturally by the oil glands in our skin to moisten and maintain our skin's barrier. 

So, what's the difference between squalene and squalane (with a "a"), and why are we bottling it? Squalene production reduces with age, as it does with many other natural chemicals with beauty benefits. Squalene can be obtained from both plant and animal sources, but because the fatty molecule is unstable in its natural state, it must first be hydrogenated (or combined with hydrogen) into squalane, a more stable version that still acts like the same molecule and provides similar benefits, before it can be used in skincare products. 

What is the origin of squalane? 

 Squalene is traditionally obtained from the livers of sharks, where it can be found in great concentrations. (In fact, squalene receives its name from the genus Squalus, which is a shark genus.) Many large cosmetic brands, however, have gladly moved away from shark-derived squalane and instead turned to other sources, as the natural organic molecule can be obtained from a variety of plants. Rice bran, wheat germ, and sugar cane all contain squalene, which is plentiful in olive oil. 

What are some of the advantages of squalane oil? 

Squalane oil has excellent emollient characteristics, which means it moisturises and hydrates your skin. Squalane is a fantastic moisturiser since it absorbs quickly and minimises water loss. One of the reasons it's such a great moisturiser is that it's a type of a substance our bodies naturally generate, so our skin recognises it right away. The lightweight oil swiftly and readily seeps into even the deepest layers of our skin. 

Other skincare and aesthetic benefits of squalane oil include: Squalane can also improve skin's radiance and vitality, minimise the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, and even diminish redness. Squalane oil actually aids in the healing of your skin's barrier. When you put it on, you're not only avoiding water loss, but you're also helping to protect your skin from the elements. Squalene possesses natural antioxidant qualities that have been discovered to prevent free radical damage in skin, in addition to these moisturising and anti-aging advantages. 

What skin types are the greatest candidates for squalane oil? 

Squalane oil is particularly effective for calming dry skin and inflammatory skin diseases like eczema, according to the dermatologists we spoke with, because of its excellent hydrating and soothing qualities. However, one of the best things about squalane oil is that it's safe and good for all skin types, even sensitive and acne-prone skin. Squalane isn't a common irritant or allergen, therefore it's unlikely to irritate even the most sensitive skin. Squalane is one of the few oils that may be used on acne-prone skin without clogging pores. 

We also recommend squalane oil for all skin types, even oily skin, because it's light and non-greasy, so it won't clog pores or cause breakouts. It's crucial to strive to nourish your skin with healthy oils even if you have oily skin. 

What is the most effective technique to apply squalane oil? 

If you want to start using squalane oil in your daily skincare routine, talk to your dermatologist first, but in general, we recommend doing the following twice a day, morning and night: 

  • First, cleanse your skin and apply whatever serums you may have. 
  •  A few drops of squalane oil should be massaged in. 
  •  Apply a moisturiser at the end (in the morning, apply a moisturiser with SPF 3o-60, or apply your sunscreen after moisturiser). 

Take Away

To have the same moisturising results, apply squalane oil to your hair and nails. Apply a few drops of squalane oil to your scalp to make your hair smoother and shinier. Massage it into your scalp, then comb it through to the tips of your hair. When it comes to your fingernails, rubbing a few drops of squalane oil into your cuticles will guarantee that you obtain the hydrating benefits, especially if your nails are dry and damaged.