Is vitamin F good for skin?
💥Buy 1 and Get any 1 free on Salary day tag products
Don’t forget to add your free product in cart

Is vitamin F good for skin?

Is vitamin F good for skin?

Vitamin F 

What exactly is vitamin F? 

Where can I find it?  

Who should make advantage of it? 

Take Away

Two necessary fatty acids make up vitamin F. These are alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), an omega-3 fatty acid, and linoleic acid (LA), an omega-6 fatty acid, both of which are vital to our skin's health. 

Filling your diet with vitamin F-rich foods can provide health benefits including lower inflammation and blood sugar regulation, or you can apply it topically to your skin for skincare benefits!  

From vitamin C's brightening effects and vitamin A's ability to exfoliate and slow down symptoms of ageing to vitamin D's ability to battle inflammation, there are a host of skin care vitamins that remain tried and true. But what if we told you there's a lesser-known vitamin to add to your trusted list, one that, despite its name, isn't truly a vitamin? Vitamin F, the non-vitamin vitamin, is now available. 

Vitamin F isn't really a vitamin in the classic sense. It refers to two fats: alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) and linoleic acid (LA) (LA). Vitamin F is made up of two naturally occurring healthy fatty acids that are your new best friend when it comes to plump, glowing skin. Continue reading to find out more. 

What exactly is vitamin F? 

Not to belabour the point, but vitamin F is not a vitamin in the traditional sense. Although the letter F stands for fat, vitamin fat would be strange. However, strangeness aside, this fatty acid combination is vastly underappreciated. An omega-4 fatty acid is ALA, whereas an omega-6 fatty acid is LA. Fatty acids such as those found in salmon and avocado not only benefit our bodies, but they also benefit our skin. A product containing an active dose of vitamin F can usually increase skin radiance after just one application. There's a new skin luminizer in town, so move over, highlighter. 

Vitamin F is found in a variety of foods, including almonds, chia seeds, and even egg yolks. If you prefer oils, this fatty acid combination can be found in rosehip, sunflower, chia, and argan oils. When applied topically, however, vitamin F aids in the strengthening and protection of the skin barrier. These fatty acids are part of the outer skin layer's seal, which lies in crevices between cells. 

Where can I find it?  

There is a plethora of foods that act as sources of vitamin F and are simple to incorporate into your diet; in fact, you may already be doing so! Avocados, almonds, chia seeds, and various types of sprouts are all excellent sources of healthful fatty acids. 

It's also found in a variety of essential oils, including Rosehip Oil and Argan Oil, which we love to include in our products. These are lovely to use in skincare, either on their own or in combination with other wonderful components.  

The skin barrier is repaired 

Skin diseases including eczema, rosacea, and even acne are linked to a faulty skin barrier and fatty acid deficiency. When administered topically, vitamin F acts as a ceramide, protecting the skin's outer layer. 

Enhances skin radiance 

Naturally, a rise in hydration combined with a strong skin barrier equals radiant skin. When you incorporate these fatty acids into your skin care routine, you may expect to see a radiant difference because skin breaking, peeling, and irritation are no longer an issue. 

Can aid in the treatment of acne 

Low levels of linoleic acid, one of the acids that make up vitamin F, are linked to acne. If you have acne-prone skin, using vitamin F can help reduce the redness and dryness that acne products can cause. According to one study, topically applying linoleic acid to the skin can help minimise acne flare-ups. 

Is there something to be cautious about? 

In general, experts agree that vitamin F does not come with many cautionary statements. It's usually important to test for sensitivities on a tiny area before applying anything to your skin, though it's unlikely you'll have any. 

Who should make advantage of it? 

Vitamin F is most typically used to treat dry or aged skin; however, it can be used on any skin type. We recommend it to patients who have dry, mature, or sensitive skin, as well as those who are new to retinoids. Vitamin F should be used in the morning and retinol should be applied at night. 

Take Away

Vitamin F isn't a vitamin at all, but it's quickly becoming a popular component for retaining moisture and protecting the skin's outer layer. It's generally safe for all skin types and issues, and it's even been related to acne reduction. It's certainly worth slathering all over your face for a brighter, smoother, and more moisturised skin, especially considering it comes with no warnings.