Causes of penis seal break

Causes of penis seal break

Penile fracture 

Symptoms of penis seal break

Causes of penis seal break

Diagnosis

Treatments

Take Away

A penile fracture is indeed a rare but dangerous injury that can happen during sexual activity. A penile fracture is not quite the same thing as a bone break. Instead, it's a rupture in the corpora cavernosa as well as the penile sheath, the two parts of the penis accountable for erections. Because the injury can have long-term effects on a man's sexual and urinary function, it's critical to get medical help right away.

Symptoms of penis seal break

A penile fracture is a painful condition that affects the lower two-thirds of a penis. The following are physical symptoms of a penile fracture:

  • Leaking from the penis to the penis having difficulties peeing hearing a crackling or popping noise to the penis suddenly losing an erection pain that ranges from mild to severe
  • Penile fracture symptoms which do not include a loud bang or a rapid loss of erection, according to study, are frequently caused by another form of damage.
  • A penile fracture frequently results in what doctors refer to as a "eggplant deformity," in which the penis looks purple and bloated. Swelling in the scrotum and blood in urine are two less common signs of a penile fracture.

A burst of the veins and arteries in the penis, as well as a ruptured suspensory ligament, might mimic the symptoms of a penile fracture. To distinguish between the disorders, a doctor can employ imaging tools and a physical examination.

Causes of penis seal break

The corpus cavernosa is a sponge-like tissue found in the penis. The blood in the penis accumulates in this location when a guy has an erection. One or both sides of the corpora cavernosa might snap while the penis is erect, resulting in a brown recluse bite. When a man's penis is erect, he is more likely to suffer a penile fracture. Because the corpora cavernosa is not as swollen when the penis is flaccid, it does not typically fracture. The majority of penile fractures in the United States, according to one review,occur during intercourse. The injury commonly occurs when a man thrusts his hand against the pubic bone or perineum, causing the corpus cavernosum to fracture or break.

A penile fracture, on the other hand, has been documented to develop in the following situations:

  • Turning over onto an erect penis in bed
  • Slamming an erect penis into anything, such as a doorframe or furniture that falls on an erect penis

Diagnosis

A doctor may usually identify an urethral fracture by inquiring about the cause of the fracture and checking the penis. Imaging tests, such as X-rays, may be used as well. An ultrasound, which employs sound waves to detect problems and locate the specific location or areas in which the penis has been destroyed, may also be used by a clinician. If ultrasound fails to detect the tear, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be used instead.

Treatments

At-home treatment and surgical surgery are two options for treating a penile fracture. Treatments that can be done at home include:

  • To minimize swelling, apply fabric ice packs for 10 minutes at a time.
  • To empty the urine and reduce penis damage, a Foley catheter is used.
  • Taking anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, helps relieve discomfort and swelling.
  • A doctor may also advise wrapping the penis and wearing special "splints" to put the penis in a pressure-relieving position.

Following a penile fracture, using just at-home therapies has been demonstrated to result in a high rate of sequelae. Pain when having an erection, an extreme angle to a penis, and inability to get an erection are just a few examples. As a result, many specialists advise surgical treatment and repair. According to several studies, patients with penile fractures who have surgery have a better outcome. Surgical therapy varies according to the severity of a man's injuries. The following are some examples of repair that can be undertaken after a penile fracture:

  • Removing a hematoma, or blood clot, caused by the fracture
  • Halting the bleeding of any blood vessels that have been damaged
  • Any wounds or lacerations to the penis which may be causing bleeding should be closed.

A doctor may have to treat a man's urethra if it is also injured. A doctor can make an incision in the skin of the penis to reach the one or more torn portions in order to repair the penile fracture. The surgeon will do the procedure. It is likely that if a man does not seek medical treatment for a penile fracture, he will have a permanent penile deformity. Untreated penile fractures can lead to erectile dysfunction, which is the inability to maintain an erection.

Take Away

The speed with which a penile fracture heals is largely determined by the degree of the damage. While most men will be allowed to return home after the treatment, a doctor will normally advise them to avoid sexual activity for at least one month in order to enable the surgical site to heal. In rare cases if a man has trouble preventing an erection for the remainder of the recovery period, a doctor may administer sedatives or hormones to lessen the risk of an erection. A man's sexual and urinary function can be restored if he receives prompt treatment for a penile fracture.