a man holding a phone while staring at his laptop

5 Creative Solutions for Reducing Screen Time

Screen Time 

On one hand, technology has enabled us to become far more productive. It has assisted us in automating repetitive chores and determining when we are most effective. We also have access to an inexhaustible amount of data. It has also improved our ability to communicate and interact with others.  

On the other hand, it can be annoying and obstruct creative thought. Worse yet, some people say we're completely addicted to technology. And it goes without saying that this isn't good for our mental and physical wellbeing. 

If you think I'm exaggerating, consider this: in 2016, it was discovered that we spend more than 10 hours every day on screens. Honestly, that shouldn’t be strange because we’re tied to our computers, TVs, and phones.  

When it comes to phones, we spend an average of 3 hours and 15 minutes on them. Furthermore, we use our phones 58 times per day. However, I believe these percentages are significantly higher due to an increase in WFH and social isolation caused by COVID-19. Obviously, this will have an impact on our productivity. What's more troubling? Too much screen time can harm our vision, disrupt our sleep, and push us to live a more sedentary lifestyle. Anxiety, tension, and despair are all possible outcomes. 

What are the reasons for this? On social media, we're comparing ourselves to others. And, because we're always available, we're working too much. Simply put, you need to cut down on your screen time. And by adopting the tactics below, you'll be able to do just that.  

5 Solutions for Reducing Screen Time

  • Keep track of how much time you spend in front of the device and set time limitations. 

You're probably certain that you're not spending too much time in front of the device. Why would you want to limit your consumption if you're in denial? 

Keeping your ignorance is a bliss mentality at bay. Make an attempt to keep track of how much time you spend staring at that brilliant blue light. The best part? There are numerous tools available to help you with this. And, because they run quietly in the background, you may go about your business as usual. If you have an iPhone 12, simply turn on the Screen Time function in the Settings app. On Android devices, use the Digital Wellbeing tools in Settings to accomplish this. 

After then, you can set time limitations based on the facts and solutions you've gathered. If you've discovered that you're spending too much time on Instagram, for example, you can set your phone to turn the app off after two hours of use. 

This information can also be used to make a schedule. Assume you don't want to be interpreted between the hours of 8 and 10 a.m., because that's when you're most productive. After that, you can restrict apps and websites for this period of time.  

  • Don't bring your phone into the bedroom. 

In The Guardian, Alex Hern says, "Many of us use our phones as alarm clocks, which means they are the last thing we see at night." It's also the first thing we see when we wake up, possibly even before our eyes open fully. The amount of blue light we are exposed to can have an impact on the quality of our sleep. In fact, social media use in the 30 minutes before bedtime has been linked to disturbed sleep in young adults, according to a study.  

Even if you aren't on social media, the blue light you are exposed to will affect the quality of your sleep. Furthermore, grabbing your phone as the alarm goes off indicates that you aren't simply turning on the light. You're currently laying in bed, going through your email. As a result, you end up staying in bed later than you intended and becoming concerned about the day. 

What is the solution? Charge your phone in a different room and avoid staring at displays for at least an hour before going to bed. Also, purchase an alarm clock. 

  • Create technology-free zones. 

That last suggestion got me thinking. What other locations should you declare "tech-free zones"?  

The bathroom is at the very top of the priority list. It's unsanitary, and it only serves to keep you from getting on with your business. I'd also suggest the dining room or any other location where you eat. Again, it's disgusting, and you could use this time doing something more productive, such as spending quality time with your family or getting to know your teammates better. 

  • Don't bring your phone with you at times. 

It will take hours for me to answer if you contact me during off-hours, such as the evenings or weekends. It's possible that you won't hear from me for another day or two. I'm not going to ignore you. It's simply that I don't have my phone with me. If I decide to go on a hike, for example, my phone is most likely in the car — or at the very least on silent mode and stowed away in my backpack. The phone is nowhere near me, even if I'm just relaxing and reading. 

Some people may be scared by this because of FOMO. In all seriousness, if you progressively work your way up, you'll realize that the world will continue to revolve even if you leave your phone at home. 

  • Change the colour scheme to grayscale. 

You can make your phone's display grayscale on both iOS and Android. As a result, all of the lovely colours on your screen will be gone.  Why is this method effective in reducing your phone addiction? Because they've lost their aesthetic value. 

Go to Settings if you're using an iPhone. Select Accessibility > Display & Text Size > Color Filters from the drop-down menu. Finally, turn on the switch so that the Grayscale choice is visible. Open up the settings panels on your Android device and click to Digital Wellbeing. You can either turn Grayscale on immediately or schedule it for later if you choose Wind Down. 

Take Away

It is not always possible to avoid looking at the screen but the above-mentioned solutions can help you deal with screen time issues. Always keep a check on your screen time and if possible put a limit to how much time you are spending infront of the screen.