Oral sex

What is oral sex?

Oral sex

Oral sex and sexually transmitted diseases 

How to reduce the health risk of oral sex?

What is an orgasm?

Take Away 

When a person uses their mouth to sexually excite the genitals of another person, this is known as oral sex. On a female, oral sex normally entails licking or sucking the clitoris and other vulva components external genitals. Cunnilingus is another name for it. You've probably heard the term dining out before. Sucking or licking the penis is an example of oral sex performed on a male. It's known as fellatio. You've undoubtedly heard it referred to as a blow job or something like that. Because the meanings of slang words are not always apparent, they might be perplexing. Blow job,for example, has nothing to do with blowing, and eating out has nothing to do with chewing. Some people may find some slang terminology offensive. Because various people enjoy different things, there is no "correct" technique to conduct oral sex on someone. Each pair of people must investigate the specifics with a little imagination and a lot of open communication. That means you'll have to try new things and see what your partner likes and dislikes.

Oral sex can result in physical pleasure and orgasms, thus it is clearly a sexual act. Some people believe that oral sex is extremely intimate and implies that two people are extremely close. Others think it's not as intimate as vaginal intercourse. Everyone must determine the importance they have on each sexual behaviour for themselves. It's crucial to stay true with yourself and do things that make you happy.

Oral sex and Sexually transimmitted diseases

It's critical to be aware of the risks associated with any sexual activity. If partners have unprotected oral intercourse, STDs can be spread. Allowing a partner to ejaculate in the mouth or ingesting their spouse's vaginal fluids appeals to certain people, while it appeals to others. If either partner has an STD, pre-ejaculatory fluid, semen, or vaginal fluids reach the body through the mouth or another entrance, there's a chance of transmission. It's difficult to know if someone has an infection. Sometimes people get infected and are completely unaware of it. When delivering (or receiving) oral sex, one approach to lower your chance of contracting an STD is to use a latex barrier, such as a flavoured latex barrier.

How to reduce the health risk of oral sex?

If you give rather than receive oral sex, you're more likely to catch STIs. Because you're more likely to become involved with vaginal secretions, this is the case. If you have cuts, sores, or ulcers in the mouth, or if you don't use protection, your risk increases. In any event, you should exercise caution and there are actions you can take to keep oral sex safer. Use of protection, such as a condom or dental dam, can help to lessen the health hazards of oral intercourse. A dental dam is a thin latex or plastic square that helps prevent STIs by covering a vaginal or anus during oral intercourse.

Another strategy to lower the health hazards of oral sex is to avoid it if you or your partner:

  • A sexually transmitted infection
  • Have wounds, sores, or ulcers around the mouth or genitals, warts, or rashes
  • Have mouth piercings or genital piercings that haven't healed or are inflammatory
  • Have a sore throat
  • Are you currently on your period

What is an orgasm?

The release of tension that occurs during sex or masturbation is known as an orgasm. It's frequently powerful and quite pleasurable. Coming/cumming or climaxing is another term for having an orgasm. You may sense changes in your body before and during an orgasm, such as:

  • Warmth and redness appear on your face and chest.
  • Your heart is racing.
  • Muscular spasms in the genital region
  • A pleasant sensation in the genitals or perhaps across your entire body

The penis squirts a tiny amount (1-2 teaspoons) of semen, a white liquid containing sperm and other fluids, after an orgasm. This is referred to as ejaculation. It is possible to have an orgasm without ejaculating or to ejaculate without having an orgasm, but they are most often experienced together. Fluid can also shoot out of the vulva before or during an orgasm, which is referred to as female ejaculation. This substance isn't pee. Female ejaculation is less prevalent than ejaculation from the penis, but if it happens to you, don't worry - it's perfectly normal. There is no one correct technique to experience an orgasm because everyone is different. It's possible that you'll be able to achieve an orgasm swiftly and painlessly. You may also require extra time or a certain form of stimulus. When you masturbate, you might be able to achieve an orgasm, but not once you have intercourse with a partner.

All of these variations are to be expected. Although many people believe that having an orgasm is the purpose of sex, doing sexual actions can provide a great deal of pleasure even if you don't experience one. In fact, putting a lot of pressure on yourself or your partner to have an orgasm might make you or your partner apprehensive, making sex difficult and unpleasant. Relax and remember that the goal is pleasure, not orgasms.

Take Away 

When you engage in oral intercourse, you run the risk of catching an STD. Use a condom or a dental dam if you're having a casual oral sex session. These devices can protect you and the partner while also lowering your chances of contracting an STD. To avoid further issues, avoid oral intercourse if you or your partner have cuts, sores, or ulcers in the mouth, around your genitals, or in your anus. STD symptoms aren't often obvious immediately, and they can interfere with fertility and overall health.